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Typography

Duplicate

Duplicate is Loyola’s official type family, including two typefaces from Commercial Type Foundry. It is simple, personable, and compact. It reflects the nurturing, generous, and welcoming aspects of Loyola’s brand personality.

Duplicate Ionic Use in different weights for headlines, section headers, large introduction paragraphs, and calls to action.

Duplicate Sans Use in different weights for section headers, body copy, sidebar body text, calls to action, captions, and bylines.

comparison of the duplicate font and alternatives

Alternate Free Fonts

The Duplicate font family is a licensed typeface with well-enforced license compliance. If you do not have access to a license for Duplicate, you may use the following free Google fonts in its place.

Source Serif Pro in place of Duplicate Ionic
https://fonts.google.com/specimen/Source+Serif+Pro

Roboto Sans in place of Duplicate Sans
https://fonts.google.com/specimen/Roboto


Friz Quadrata

Friz Quadrata is used in the university logo, in the LOYOLA horseshoe letters, and in select building signage and stationery items.

  • Friz Quadrata should not be used for any purpose other than those listed above.
  • Friz Quadrata is not to be used in any application except with express written approval from the Office of Marketing and Communications.
  • Loyola logos should never be recreated with live type. Please use only approved graphic logo files downloaded from the Marketing and Communications website.

type style tips

example of tight leading compared to loose leading

  • Never hyphenate wraps, headlines, or body copy
  • Never justify body copy
  • When employing different weights of type in the same paragraph, use weights that are at least two steps apart (i.e. Duplicate Iconic Regular can be used with Thin or Bold, but shouldn’t be used with Light or Medium.)
  • Use tight leading on headline copy (not much space between lines of type).
  • Use loose leading on body copy (lots of space between lines of type)

Other fonts are OK!*

faith and glory not allowedIf every piece of promotional material used the same two fonts, things would start to look really boring really fast. Get creative and play with other typefaces! As long as your piece honors the logo guidelines outlined in this brand book, your design is probably ok.

*NOTE: The script font Faith and Glory is no longer a university font and is not acceptable for use on any Loyola materials except with express written approval from the Office of Marketing and Communications.